Green Harvest

Saturday promised to be sunny and hot as we were driven to the La Spinetta Campe winery near the town of Grinzane Cavour in the Piemonte region of Italy. We were going to La Spinetta to participate in the green harvest. Gathering in the tasting room with about 18 others from Switzerland, Denmark, and Belgium we were welcomed by Anja Cramer, (responsible for marketing), Giorgio Rivetti (the wine maker and co-owner), Giovanna (Giorgio’s sister, vineyard supervisor and cook), and Manuela Rivetti (Italian sales and winery visits). We were given background on La Spinetta, a family owned and run winery (http://www.la-spinetta.com/index.htm). The work we would be doing that morning was some of the most important work done in the vineyards and involves cutting off almost half of the clusters of green grapes from the vines. This work is done before the grapes start to turn color and is done so that the plant provides all of its energy to fewer grapes. It reduces the quantity of wine produced significantly but increases the quality. La Spinetta is all about the quality where as other commercial wineries are more concerned on the volume of wine produced.

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We were given aprons and cutters and headed for the vineyard. There we met the part of the field crew that works for La Spinetta for harvest, pruning, thinning, and green harvest. They are all very skilled at what they do and are supervised by Giovanna.

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Divided into groups of 5 or 6 we were assigned to one or two of these workers. Giovanna showed how they wanted to have about 5 or 6 grape clusters remaining on each vine, though it depended on the age of the vine and the size of the clusters. Some of the clusters were long and we were to cut them shorter so that the remaining grapes would do better.

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The thinning had the functions of making fewer clusters so that each received more nourishment but also to create space between clusters so that they would stay dry. If clusters are too close together and it rains they do not dry well and then mold forms and ruins the grapes. After the demonstrations we were ready to work under the watchful eye of the skilled workers. When we would have a question about whether or not to cut off a cluster we would say, “Questo? (this one)” and get a “si” or “no” or “corto” (shoren it). It was a little unnerving to think that each cluster cut would be less wine, Barolo in this case, made.

 

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Our group would move down the row each taking a vine to harvest and then when done moving past the last one down the row to select another vine. There is another vineyard between two of La Spinetta’s properties that is not owned by them. The owner is not a winemaker and sell the grapes to other winemakers. He does not do green harvest and you could see the vines thick with green grape clusters. For this grower it is all about production of a lot of grapes. Giorgio said that the winemakers who buy these grapes are not farmers and by not being farmers they don’t understand that the quality of the wine begins in the vineyard.

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Just when it seemed we were getting the hang of it we stopped for lunch. Lunch was served at the ciabót, a little hut or house in the vineyards where the vignaioli used to store their tools and take their breaks in the heat of the day. Lunch was simple, but delicious “finger food” prepared by Giovanna accompanied by La Spinetta wines (of course!).

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It was a good time to relax, eat, drink wine, meet and talk with the other people there and to enjoy the lush green view across Barolo wine country.

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Then it was back down the hill to the winery to turn in our cutters and back to the hotel to clean up and rest before dinner.

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Dinner was in Canelli at the Contratto winery. Contratto is a very old sparkling winery that was acquired by La Spinetta very recently. The winery is built into the side of a large hill and consists of multilevel tunnels dug into the hill. The winery was built over a 100 years ago without the machinery or technology we have now and it is very impressive to see how well it was constructed. I forgot to bring my camera in the evening so I cannot show you just how beautiful the facility is. They still use the manual process for “riddling” (getting the yeast into the neck of the bottle so it can be expelled before the final bottling.) All of the large sparkling wine companies have machines that do that now. We had a demonstration of riddling from a man that has worked there for 30 years. There soon will not be anyone with those skills around.

We had aperitivos in a underground tasting room (with some Contratto sparking wine, of course). Then we returned above ground to what was once a restaurant on part of the winery where we had a lovely meal prepared by Giovanna accompanied by several La Spinetta wines.

We were fortunate of be sitting by Giorgio and were treated to many stories. It is clear that they are passionate about their wine making and they work very hard to product the best wines that they can. One of the other guests told us that a La Spinetta had been rated the second best Barolo in Italy and was ranked among the best wines in the world. The evening ended with a 2004 Barolo Reserve and it couldn’t have ended better.

Ciao!

(for more pictures go to:  http://gallery.me.com/doughiza/100175)

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